Stress is Contagious all Year Round

NP Career Blog

Stress is Contagious all Year Round

 

Have you heard about “secondhand stress”?  Turns out that stress may be transmitted from one person to another as easily as germs.  Dr. Amit Sood, who is an expert on stress at the Mayo Clinic, recently told the Star Tribune that “Stress travels in social networks,” and “It is highly, highly contagious.”

 

No surprise to any of us who have experienced stress in the workplace.  All it takes is one chronically anxious or irritable co-worker to start the wheels in motion and next thing you know the whole atmosphere at work has become toxic.  Early symptoms include decreased productivity, lack of morale and general mistrust.  Eventually, if not treated will result in chaos, back-stabbing and rapid staff turnover. 

 

No one wants to work in a toxic workplace.  The problem is that like many disorders, the condition is not always apparent to the casual observer.  And some organizations have become quite skilled in hiding their dysfunction. 

 

Since there is no known vaccine to prevent secondhand stress the best defense is primary prevention. In other words, you should avoid contact with the afflicted. 

If you are searching for a new Nurse Practitioner job,
the following suggestions will help you identify a potentially troubled workplace so that you do not fall victim to secondhand stress.     

Ask questions  

 

What happened to the person who was in the job before?  Why did they leave?  If your interviewer is hesitant or stumbles over their answer this could signal a problem.  Be especially alert for signs that the previous employee left suddenly or unexpectedly for reasons other than personal illness. 

 

Are there any other new staff?  If there seems to be an awful lot of new employees it could mean the organization or clinic has recently had a mass exodus.  If that is the case then you need to know why all those folks left.  

 

How long has the clinic manager been in their position? If there is new management, it could mean the organization is currently undergoing big changes and staff is still adjusting.  Some changes might be good ones, but change is still stressful.   

 

How long has the position been open?  Some jobs are open a long time for a perfectly good reason, but it could also mean no one wants the job. 

 

Do some cyber-snooping

Google the organization.  Many healthcare websites have ratings and allow comments.  Disgruntled patients can be a sign of an unhealthy environment.  Facebook and twitter might also give you a snapshot of what employees and patients are saying about the hospital or clinic.  Granted there will always be a one or two complainers but if you see a pattern then you should start to wonder what is going on. 

See for yourself

 

If you still have that nagging feeling that something doesn’t seem quite right you might consider asking for a “Shadow day”.  It’s easy for an employer to put on a good face or talk a good game during an interview.   Spending a half or whole day shadowing is a great way to get a feel for an organization.  Stress is hard to hide.  According to the article, the source of the stress can be compared to a vibrating tuning fork that causes everything close to it to vibrate as well.  Trust me, it won’t take you long to pick up on vibrations. 

Nurse Practitioners: Have you Branded Yourself?

 

Nurse Practitioners specialize in a number of areas from Acute Care, Family, Adult, Oncology and Woman’s Care just to name a few. Because of these highly specialized required skills set employers can have trouble finding top talent to fill their positions through traditional job postings. That means corporate healthcare recruiters turn to recruitment agencies and social media for help source the right candidates. Nurse Practitioners should take this opportunity to brand themselves on their social platforms because recruiters are looking to the web in places like Google Plus, FaceBook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Blogs and other online platforms to find the best talent!  

 

What do I mean by branding? Branding is simply a way to promote yourself much like the way Pepsi brands and promotes their products. Personal Branding is a way to showcase your unique abilities and skills as a professional nurse practitioner. Check out Dan Schawbel’s PersonalBranding Blog. He’s an expert on building personal brands and has incredibly useful information to help you brand yourself. I also recommend using the platform Brand Yourself. The Brand Yourself website is free and will help you clean up your online identity with the goal of your name and brand rising to the top of recruiters’ organic searches for “Nurse Practitioners”.

Once you have established your personal brand and identity it’s time to update your social media profiles to host the same information. Keeping your message clear and consistent will help your profiles rise to the top of Google searches and will nicely package your online personal brand. Carefully select which social media profiles you wish to be professional. Starting with LinkedIn is always best and then make decisions as to whether you want to add Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and blogs. When settling up your profile information make sure key information like your name (first and last) and title are public. The information that is public is the information searchable by recruiters.

After your brand has been establish and your profiles are updated you can begin to network. Start with linking in to like professionals, past professors and any professional connections you’ve made through your work and schooling. Participate in LinkedIn groups and Twitter conversations. Seek out companies you wish to work for and their human resources recruiters and/or hiring managers and make connections. Just like in the “old” days networking has been very effective in helping people find and gain employment. In today’s world both traditional and social media networking is important in building those relationships and will help you stand apart from the rest of the competition.

As a professional healthcare recruiter I see firsthand how online branding can increase the chances of top talent being found. So go forth and take ownership of your personal brand today!

Guest Blogger:My name is Bonnie Ungaro. I am a corporate healthcare recruiter for Centegra Health System. We are a fast growing healthcare system in McHenry County Illinois (A northwest suburb of Chicago). Currently we are seeking multiple Nurse Practitioners to fill our newly created Acute Care positions.. We are also seeking Nurse Practitioners to support our physician practices in local nursing homes.
If you’re interested in this opportunity we would love to hear from you!!  To learn more about our positions I invite you to check out our Careers page here.

If you’re interested in learning more about our Acute Care Nurse Practitioner positions please contact me at: bungaro@centegra.com

5 Steps for an Effective New Grad NP Job Search

Hello New Grads!

Abe Lincoln once advised “If I had 8 hours to chop down a tree, I would spend 7 sharpening my axe”.


Don’t get worried, I don’t actually want you to chop anything down! My point is that I want you to be well prepared before you begin your NP job search.

In my last column for Advance for NPs & PAs I outlined 5 essential steps to include in your job search plan.

In my column you will find advice on

  • Applying too soon (yes, you can apply too soon)
  • Finding and choosing the proper references
  • How to sell yourself and your skills
  • Handling the dreaded “strength and weakness” interview question.

Click here to read more

Successful Job Searching after 60

Many of my posts are aimed at the New Graduate NP or PA but recently I had a question from a reader who was concerned about finding a new job after 60.

Dear Career Coach: I am wondering if you have any thoughts or advice about finding a job after age 60. I have been in practice for about 18 years. I am finding it rather scary to quit my job because I am worried about whether I will really be able to get another job. What do you think?

Dear Mature Job Seeker: Employers are looking for two main characteristics when they hire an employee. The first characteristic is your skills and expertise. After 18 years in practice I think we can safely say you should have no problem meeting that standard. But having experience isn’t enough, because the second thing most employers are looking for is employees who will stay with them for the long term. We all know that technically (and legally) an employer is not allowed to factor your age into their hiring decision, but I think we would both be kidding ourselves if we think that an employer is eager to hire someone who is within shouting distance of their retirement. The truth of the matter is that hiring a clinician is expensive and time consuming, and employers don’t want to have to go through the hiring process every couple of years – especially during tough economic times.

One option you may want to consider is doing a temporary or locum tenens assignment. You might find that short-term assignments are a nice fit with where you are in your career journey. This is the one setting where long-term commitments are not required or expected. Assignments can range anywhere from a few weeks to a year in length. When I was recruiting I filled many of my temp positions with “mature” clinicians who liked to work temp positions because they enjoyed the freedom and the variety. And did I mention the pay? Temp jobs usually pay very well. If you are willing to travel the opportunities are even greater.

Teaching is another idea you might want to entertain. Many colleges and universities employ folks in our profession in an “adjunct” type position to work with nursing or other healthcare students. They may have a need for teaching or assisting with specific courses or for supervising the students in their clinical rotations.

Above all, no matter what your age, I never advise that you quit your current job until you have a new job secured

Click here to read my original post and comments. 
Seems I stirred up a bit of controversy!

New Grad Class of 2013 – this blog is for YOU

Graduation is exciting but also a little stressful. New grads (or maybe I should call them “soon-to-be-grads”) spend almost as much of their last semester worrying about getting their first job as they do studying.

Well, I personally have never seen any value to worry. It’s far better to spend your time preparing instead of worrying.  And luckily for new grads there is some good advice out there.

Advance for NPs and PAs puts out a great “Guide for NP & PA New Grads” every year and it is chock full of both practical and valuable advice.

This year 2013 the guide has gone digital and you will find 4 extremely helpful articles.

The first (which just happens to be written by me!) is Salary Tips for the New Grad.  I discuss realistic salary expectations as well as the proper time to negotiate.  You might be surprised at what I have to say.  Read more

There is also a nice article on Building a Better Resume. This piece includes some nice tips on social media, keywords and paper resumes.  As your trusted NP Career Coach I can say without reservation that the advice is spot on and will help you be more successful in landing that job interview.

Speaking of interviews, did you know that the new trend is to do your interview via Skype?  Check out the handy tips in Get Psyched to Skype.  You will be glad you did.

And finally, read Networking Know-How and find out how to make the most out of your networking.

Access the entire guide HERE 

 

HAPPY GRADUATION CLASS OF 2013!

 

More reasons to hate on the term “mid-level” – as if there weren’t enough already…

As many of you know I do not particularly care for the term “mid-level” practitioner.  Just in case you aren’t familiar with my opinions on the subject you can read one of my posts from May 2012 in which I give numersous reasons to shun the term.  (if you agree please share!)

Now, as if there weren’t already enough reasons to dislike that label I have found yet another – and it is a doozy.

I came across a link to what is actually a very handy grid from which outlines the DEA authorization to prescribe controlled substances in each state. It is a state by state guide to which schedules we are allowed to prescribe.  This is actually quite a helpful resource if you are considering a move to another state or perhaps thinking of doing a NP or PA travel or locum tenens assignment.

The guide starts out with the official definition of a “mid-level” provider.

Pursuant to Title 21, Code of Federal Regulations, Section 1300.01(b28), the term mid-level practitioner means an individual practitioner, other than a physician, dentist, veterinarian, or podiatrist, who is licensed, registered, or otherwise permitted by the United States or the jurisdiction in which he/she practices, to dispense a controlled substance in the course of professional practice. Examples of mid-level practitioners include, but are not limited to, health care providers such as nurse practitioners, nurse midwives, nurse anesthetists, clinical nurse specialists and physician assistants who are authorized to dispense controlled substances by the state in which they practice.

OK, I don’t like this definition but I can live with it, at least for now.  But then I kept reading and I see that also included in this mid-level category is “animal shelters” and “euthanasia technicians”.  WTF?

This is still a helpful guide but it really is hard to look past this.  Who can we complain to?

You really must see it for yourself.  Click here.

Not sure? Shadowing might be the solution.

Have you received a job offer but you just aren’t sure if you are ready to accept?

You may have left the interview feeling a little rushed, and that your questions were not fully answered. This is not unusual.

Receiving an NP or PA job offer is a bit like receiving a marriage proposal. It’s very flattering to know that you are wanted. But sometimes you can find yourself so overwhelmed by the notion that someone truly desires you that you don’t consider whether or not the feeling is mutual.

Starting a new job is not unlike a marriage, it is big commitment and shouldn’t be left to one’s emotions, because once done, it’s not easy to undo. It’s one of life’s little ironies (or jokes) that getting out of a bad relationship can be much more complicated than entering into one.  (We will leave the topic of how to gracefully “divorce” a job for another blog!)

So for those of you entertaining an offer but still feeling unsure I recommend you consider a longer engagement. Before you think I have completely gone off the rails let me explain.

Ask for a “shadow” day. This has become more and more common in recent years. Requesting to spend a shift or two with one of their current providers, “shadowing” is a good way for both parties to get to know each other better.

As a clinician, you will get a clearer idea of not only the job duties and patient flow but also the personality of the practice. Remember, an interview lasts usually no more than an hour and everyone is on their best behavior. It’s a little harder to hide dysfunction for an entire day. If there is an undercurrent of tension or disorganization you are going to pick up on it.

So what’s in it for the employer? A good fit, that’s what employers get out of the shadow. Employers are just as eager to find an employee who fits in with their practice culture as you are to find a practice that fits you. A happy employee is a long term employee. As I have said many times before, clinicians rarely leave jobs where they are happy even if they can make better money elsewhere. Great pay and benefits aren’t enough for happiness.

Now that I think about it, that is the case for many marriages as well…

From a blog originally published on Advance for NPs and PAs

Pick me! Pick me! How can you get a recruiters attention?

A reader recently asked me why employers choose one nurse pracitioner application over another.

I offered up this advice in my latest blog: Advanceweb.http://community.advanceweb.com/blogs/np_6/archive/2013/02/06/applications-and-interest.aspx

Dear NP Career Coach: What can I do to get employers to notice my application? I would like to know if there is anything you can recommend that will increase my chances of landing an interview. Can you help?

Dear Job Seeker: Obviously it is important that your resume show the employer that you possess the right qualification and skills for the job. However, you also need to convince them that you have a genuine interest and a strong desire for the position.

Employers tell me that if you are able to clearly articulate the reason you are applying for the position then they will be more likely to want to interview you. So how do you demonstrate to a potential employer you have a passion for their position? I have a couple tips to help you.

  1. Research the employer. Learning about their culture, mission and history is one way to show an employer you are interested in them. The information you gather will help you to emphasize why you are the right fit for them. And if you get a call or an interview it will also help you to formulate the right questions to ask. Start by checking out their website or Facebook page.
  2. Make clear the reason WHY you want this position and make sure that your reason makes sense. The best tool for you to express your motivating reason is the cover letter. Use your cover letter to explain why you feel drawn to the position. Perhaps you have previously worked with this population or specialty before. Or maybe your reason is that you did a clinical rotation in their organization. If you know someone who is a current employee who has inspired you to apply that is perfectly good reason as well. (Name dropping is allowed!) Just remember that whatever your rationale, it needs to be employer-centered and show clear benefit to the employer. For example, proclaiming that you want the job because the hours or commute better suits your lifestyle is not helpful.
  3. Don’t “over-apply” or be a “serial applier.” When employers see you submitting several applications for several different positions it makes you look like you either don’t know what you want to do or that you are desperate. Neither of those options is very attractive. Think carefully before applying; if you aren’t sure why you want the job, then you are unlikely to convince anyone else why you would want it either.

3 Essential Components of a Successful Nurse Practitioner Resume

Tuesday Tip:

I have preached this for years.  Call it a resume trifecta, the holy trinity or the triple play but every (and I mean EVERY) NP resume must contain these 3 critical pieces of information.  If employers do not find this information – and find it quickly – your resume will never make it past the first round.

It’s a simple formula really

1. Your education
2. Your certification
3. Your skills

Create your resume around these elements. Remember, we review your resume in less than 15 seconds so you must make these 3 bits of data the centerpiece of your resume. Skip the fancy formatting, long winded “objective” statements and just focus on ensuring that this information as easy for us to find as possible.

What to know what to include under each of these 3 headings?
Read my latest blog here

Survey says: 2012 was a Good Year!

The “2012 Advanced Practice Clinician Compensation and Pay Practices Survey Report” a survey conducted by Sullivan, Cotter and Associates indicates that 2012 was a good year to be an NP or PA.

Key findings include:

NPs and PA job openings:

  • A 17% increase in the number of Advanced Practice Clinicians positions was reported by 63% of the respondents
  • In addition half the respondents plan to increase the number of NPs and PAs in their organizations by 15% during the coming year

NP and PA salaries:

  • 62% indicated that NP and PA salaries increased by an average of 3.9% over the past year.
  • At least half revealed they are planning salary increases of an average of 3.1% in 2013 for their Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants.

Reasons cited for the trends:

  • Team based care driving the demand for more NPs and PAs
  • MD shortage
  • Recent national trends to ensure all medical professions can work at the top of their practice level and training.

While this is only one study it does confirm that the market is moving in a positive direction.  This doesn’t mean we can relax just yet though, my contacts tell me that open positions are still attracting large numbers of applicants.